Lincoln Dreamt He Died: The Midnight Visions of Remarkable Americans from Colonial Times to Freud #2020

Lincoln Dreamt He Died: The Midnight Visions of Remarkable Americans from Colonial Times to Freud Andrew Burstein Lincoln Dreamt He Died The Midnight Visions of Remarkable Americans from Colonial Times to Freud Before Sigmund Freud made dreams the cornerstone of understanding an individual s inner life Americans shared their dreams unabashedly with one another through letters diaries and casual conversati

  • Title: Lincoln Dreamt He Died: The Midnight Visions of Remarkable Americans from Colonial Times to Freud
  • Author: Andrew Burstein
  • ISBN: 9781137278272
  • Page: 394
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Lincoln Dreamt He Died: The Midnight Visions of Remarkable Americans from Colonial Times to Freud Andrew Burstein Before Sigmund Freud made dreams the cornerstone of understanding an individual s inner life, Americans shared their dreams unabashedly with one another through letters, diaries, and casual conversation In this innovative new book, highly regarded historian Andrew Burstein goes back for the first time to discover what we can learn about the lives and emotions of AmericansBefore Sigmund Freud made dreams the cornerstone of understanding an individual s inner life, Americans shared their dreams unabashedly with one another through letters, diaries, and casual conversation In this innovative new book, highly regarded historian Andrew Burstein goes back for the first time to discover what we can learn about the lives and emotions of Americans, from colonial times to the beginning of the modern age Through a thorough study of dreams recorded by iconic figures such as John and Abigail Adams, Thomas Jefferson, and Abraham Lincoln, as well as everyday men and women, we glimpse the emotions of earlier generations and understand how those feelings shaped their lives and careers, and thus gain a fuller multi dimensional sense of our own past No one has ever looked at the building blocks of the American identity in this way, and Burstein reveals important clues and landmarks that show the origins of the ideas and values that remain central to who we are today.
    Lincoln Dreamt He Died: The Midnight Visions of Remarkable Americans from Colonial Times to Freud Andrew Burstein

    • [Û Lincoln Dreamt He Died: The Midnight Visions of Remarkable Americans from Colonial Times to Freud || ✓ PDF Read by ↠ Andrew Burstein]
      394 Andrew Burstein
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      Posted by:Andrew Burstein
      Published :2019-03-16T11:14:34+00:00

    One thought on “Lincoln Dreamt He Died: The Midnight Visions of Remarkable Americans from Colonial Times to Freud”

    1. I got this book from Poundland so thought it was worth a go as it sounded interesting from the back cover overall yes, it was, but I think the blurb and the preface bigged it up a bit too much and it fell short of my expectations For me it felt a bit bumpy and this stopped it really flowing and getting going Also, given the title Lincoln Dreamt He Died , apart from mentioning him in the blurb and the preface, the text doesn t actually get to him and his dreams until page 195 I liked a lot of the [...]

    2. I completely agree with Daffney and Kayla I had just completed his book Madison and Jefferson a superb and different approach to writing about these two giants of this country Sorely disappointed in Lincoln Dreamt and closed it after 20 or 30 pages.

    3. Sigmund Freud believed that dreams were forms of wish fulfillment, attempts made by the unconscious or dreaming mind to resolve some type of conflict, conflict either recent or something long ago buried in the dusty cobwebbed recesses of the dreamers mind These dreams according to Freud often contain information or images that seem warped, distorted, frightening, or just plain odd It is then left to the dreamer or analyst to interpret their meaning and make sense of or provide understanding as t [...]

    4. Ever since reading Ekirch s book about pre modern night, I ve been interested in second sleep patterns, part of which is much lucid dreaming and memory of dreams Burstein takes this idea and tracks down the remembered dreams of 19th century Americans, who, whether ascribing these incidents to God or their own minds, used dreams to make sense of death, long courtships and geographic separations From reading the endnotes of this book, in which published sources vastly outnumber archival collectio [...]

    5. I thought that the topic of this book was quite interesting Burstein uses dream diaries of famous and regular early Americans to study how the American dream and our national identity has been shaped since our founding I certainly have never read another book that explored such a topic However, like other reviewers, I found that the execution was rather poorly done The book what I read of itI ll be honest, I only got about halfway through reads like an academic paper and I should know, I m in gr [...]

    6. An informative historical study about who some famous people and some not and how they felt about their dreams in America s past Some of the major historical personages include Dr Benjamin Rush, Abraham Lincoln, Ralph Waldo Emerson and Louisa May Alcott I think a major theme here is that people paid much attention to and credence to the importance of dreams in times past than we do now Dreams gave them tips about how to live their lives and portended the future A great deal of research makes th [...]

    7. I got the book as a free first reads copy and was pretty happy overall.The book would be best for history fans looking for some light reading.L.D.H.D was a series of vignettes tied together by tepid psychological musings on the people, time and place of each story Good book Perfect to pick up and breeze through a few pages or plow through many.There are some quotes and observations that did make me ponder the mind for a little bit.

    8. Sort of interesting A view of history from 1700 s through 1800 s as seen through how dreams were viewed An historical study from an unusual vantage point Benjamin Rush, MD Signer from MA and John Adams wrote many letters back and forth, telling each other their dreams They had a one upmanship going Had it s interesting points.

    9. The idea is a good one But, I did not like all of the analysis of the dreams To me, it reads too uch like a text book.

    10. This was a free book giveaway.The book was okay Some parts were interesting, while others were skimmed.I can t recommend it unless you are really into dreams.

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