The Health Gap: The Challenge of an Unequal World #2019

The Health Gap: The Challenge of an Unequal World Michael Marmot The Health Gap The Challenge of an Unequal World In Balti s inner city neighborhood of Upton Druid Heights a man s life expectancy is sixty three not far away in the Greater Roland Park Poplar neighborhood life expectancy is eighty three The same

  • Title: The Health Gap: The Challenge of an Unequal World
  • Author: Michael Marmot
  • ISBN: 9781632860781
  • Page: 101
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The Health Gap: The Challenge of an Unequal World Michael Marmot In Balti s inner city neighborhood of Upton Druid Heights, a man s life expectancy is sixty three not far away, in the Greater Roland Park Poplar neighborhood, life expectancy is eighty three The same twenty year avoidable disparity exists in the Calton and Lenzie neighborhoods of Glasgow, and in other cities around the world.In Sierra Leone, one in 21 fifteen year oIn Balti s inner city neighborhood of Upton Druid Heights, a man s life expectancy is sixty three not far away, in the Greater Roland Park Poplar neighborhood, life expectancy is eighty three The same twenty year avoidable disparity exists in the Calton and Lenzie neighborhoods of Glasgow, and in other cities around the world.In Sierra Leone, one in 21 fifteen year old women will die in her fertile years of a maternal related cause in Italy, the figure is one in 17,100 but in the United States, which spends on healthcare than any other country in the world, it is one in 1,800 Why Dramatic differences in health are not a simple matter of rich and poor poverty alone doesn t drive ill health, but inequality does Indeed, suicide, heart disease, lung disease, obesity, and diabetes, for example, are all linked to social disadvantage In every country, people at relative social disadvantage suffer health disadvantage and shorter lives Within countries, the higher the social status of individuals, the better their health These health inequalities defy the usual explanations Conventional approaches to improving health have emphasized access to technical solutions and changes in the behavior of individuals, but these methods only go so far What really makes a difference is creating the conditions for people to have control over their lives, to have the power to live as they want Empowerment is the key to reducing health inequality and thereby improving the health of everyone Marmot emphasizes that the rate of illness of a society as a whole determines how well it functions the greater the health inequity, the greater the dysfunction.Marmot underscores that we have the tools and resources materially to improve levels of health for individuals and societies around the world, and that to not do so would be a form of injustice Citing powerful examples and startling statistics young men in the U.S have less chance of surviving to sixty than young men in forty nine other countries , The Health Gap presents compelling evidence for a radical change in the way we think about health and indeed society, and inspires us to address the societal imbalances in power, money, and resources that work against health equity.
    The Health Gap: The Challenge of an Unequal World Michael Marmot

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    One thought on “The Health Gap: The Challenge of an Unequal World”

    1. Thanks to and Bloomsbury for an advanced review copy This was an intriguing look into global health gaps and disparities that effect overall survival and quality of life Though it was difficult to navigate through Marmot s clear political leanings, his knowledge and ability to decipher and use data to support his theories and points make this an eye opening and insightful read I think my biggest takeaway is knowing that the U.S in fact does not have the best system for ensuring quality healthcar [...]

    2. While I tend to agree with the overarching points Marmot makes, and think it s a very important topic, I thought the book itself could have been half the length and still make those points effectively He says the same thing over and over and over again, or even in some ways repeatedly hints at the points but says on this later I think this would be good for someone new to the topic of health disparities, or someone whose profession isn t in health care but is interested in learning about health [...]

    3. The author does a good job of laying out the social determinants of health and making suggestions for how he believes health for entire populations can be improved The book is easy to read, and the author has a breezy, conversational style My average ranking may have come from my own expectations My big problem with the arguments the author makes in favor of improving overall health for all are that, if you already agree with the author, then you ll agree with his arguments For those who already [...]

    4. Admittedly, I gave up on this one The author talked a lot, but it was mostly sharing his own experiences and very little actual suggestions on policy changes He urged people to make a difference, but didn t give any specific suggestions.

    5. First of all, this book could have been a heck of a lot shorter While Marmot does make some very worthwhile cases for a healthier society, he unfortunately lacks brevity while doing so Early on in the book, Marmot claims through quoting Dickens that we presently live in the best and worst times healthcare and medicine have never been advanced, yet at the same time, the social gradient with regards to public health has also never been as high He later explains how people are a product of their c [...]

    6. A thoroughly evidenced account of the effects of inequality on health, and strategies that have successfully reduced the health gap in various countries of various political hues Full of revealing comparative statistics.

    7. Good readVery approachable book by a giant in the field of public health global health medicine Good option for a textbook but good for general public

    8. I won this in a giveaway.Very informative from an author who has the data to back up his commentary I have always believed that there is to health than germs and luck and here in the US it is becoming that health is a privilege of the wealthy Now it seems the USA will go backwards in societal health As the leader would say, SAD Nothing put forth in this book on what we should do will even be contemplated by the ones in power now.

    9. The author of this book argues that health equality is not just due to the health care but to the health of the overall society Spending lots of money on the health care hasn t improved health outcomes in the US, but may be better spent combatting child poverty right now the US is between Romania and Latvia when it comes to percentage of children in poverty He argues that make sure a child is secure and well fed will make the odds better that that child will become a tax payer rather than someon [...]

    10. I received this book, an advance reading copy, as a Giveaway with the expectation of an honest review I am a lay person with an interest in public health, emergency preparedness, and world affairs I learned so much from this well written book and highly recommend it It was written in easily understandable language and presented a cogent discussion of the global inequalities in the access to health care and underlying social problems that undermine the health of many of the world s citizens It di [...]

    11. I won this in a giveaway and overall I d say I m glad I did The author is able to show the way the social gradient works from several views including employment, child care, and the elderly The info is interesting, presented well and backed by an impressive amount of graphical evidence If there s anything negative I could say it s that at times some of information and writing was a little repetitive and occasionally it felt a little too much like the author was inserting himself into this global [...]

    12. This book has a good overview of the health inequities that our world faces He includes studies from notable economists and provides supporting data via graphs I didn t rate it higher because I studied Public and Global health in college, so most of the things he was telling us that we needed to do, I already knew about Also, Marmot talks about what we SHOULD do to decrease the gradient and lessen inequities, but he does not tell us HOW to go about this.

    13. A few interesting and provocative ideas in here His opening bit is the most powerful, which hammers the point of partially understanding society through its health issues though it s watered down by the highly expected references to the beauty of the European medical system vs American medical system In any event, the presentation of facts regarding the lives a sampling of folks can be expected to live in the US vs other countries the 15 year old example hit home can t be ignored.

    14. A factual insight into those aspects of health we don t care for in the health care system by a renowned expert inf the field A must read.

    15. Marmot lays out what health equity is, why we should care, and what to do about it in a witty and insightful way.

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