The Dream Machine: J. C. R. Licklider and the Revolution That Made Computing Personal #2019

The Dream Machine: J. C. R. Licklider and the Revolution That Made Computing Personal M. Mitchell Waldrop The Dream Machine J C R Licklider and the Revolution That Made Computing Personal In decades before personal computers and Internet became household words the revolution that gave rise to both of them was set in motion from a small nondescript office in the depths of the Pe

  • Title: The Dream Machine: J. C. R. Licklider and the Revolution That Made Computing Personal
  • Author: M. Mitchell Waldrop
  • ISBN: 9780670899760
  • Page: 362
  • Format: Hardcover
  • The Dream Machine: J. C. R. Licklider and the Revolution That Made Computing Personal M. Mitchell Waldrop In 1962, decades before personal computers and Internet became household words, the revolution that gave rise to both of them was set in motion from a small, nondescript office in the depths of the Pentagon In an age when the word computer still meant a big, ominous mainframe mysteriously processing punch cards, the occupant of that office an MIT psychologist namedIn 1962, decades before personal computers and Internet became household words, the revolution that gave rise to both of them was set in motion from a small, nondescript office in the depths of the Pentagon In an age when the word computer still meant a big, ominous mainframe mysteriously processing punch cards, the occupant of that office an MIT psychologist named J.C.R Licklider had somehow seen a future in which computers would become an exciting new medium of expression, a joyful inspiration to creativity, and a gateway to a vast on line world of information And now he was determined to use the Pentagon s money to make it all happen Written with the novelistic flair that made his Complexity the most exciting intellectual adventure story of the year Washington Post , M Mitchell Waldrop s The Dream Machine is the first full scale portrait of J.C.R Licklider and how his dream of a human computer symbiosis changed the course of science and culture But than that, it is an epic saga of technological advance that spans the history of modern computers from the Second World War to the explosion of creativity at Xerox PARC in the 1970s to the personal computer boom of the 1980s and the Internet boom of the 1990s Capturing the drama, passion, and excitement of the brilliant men and women who were caught up in one of the great intellectual and technological adventures in human history, The Dream Machine has the hallmarks of a classic.
    The Dream Machine: J. C. R. Licklider and the Revolution That Made Computing Personal M. Mitchell Waldrop

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      Published :2019-09-15T17:42:42+00:00

    One thought on “The Dream Machine: J. C. R. Licklider and the Revolution That Made Computing Personal”

    1. I have read quite a few books covering different parts of the history of computing but none of them were as expansive as this one Not sure if keeping Licklider s name in the title was necessary since the book covers so many people important to the revolution that he mostly ends up being a framing device for an expansive tale.

    2. Having just read Katie Hafner s Where Wizard s Stay Up Late I was ready to tackle this book, which is both deeper and ambitious Where Hafner s book was purely about the origin of the Internet, Waldrop is taking on the whole idea of personal computing Licklider thus provides the focus for this book, for while he played a crucial role in promoting networking, his true aim was always what he termed a symbiotic partnership between humans and computers, and for him networking was just a necessary st [...]

    3. This is probably the best book about early days of computer and internet Learned a lot and got a lot of inspirations I was so amazed that find myself end up underlining the whole page.

    4. Just brilliantBest history of the computer revolution I ve ever seen Seems to be only available on Kindle Why isn t this masterpiece back in print

    5. Incredible book I m so glad that it found the way to me somehow don t remember how it happened, maybe from some tweet from Bret Victor It goes through the history of computing, from when the Information theory was invented, ARPA, IPTO, Xerox PARC, invention of object oriented programming, Smalltalk, multitasking, graphical interface, until current notion of personal computer.I HIGHLY encourage everybody who loves computers to read this book cover to cover I ll definitely re read it in coming yea [...]

    6. Wow What a great book Looking back, I experienced punch cards in 1972 on IBM 360 Then programmed in assembler language on a Honeywell 120 in 1975 40 boot, 40 boot, run, run, run, initiated the card reader A fellow teacher brought in his Altair in the late 70 s I bought a Radio Shack color computer in 1980 It required a specific RS cassette tape recorder for storing and loading Basic programs The Honeywell was replaced by a DEC 11 34 and then a DEC 11 70, then a DEC VAX 780 Our first PC lab in 19 [...]

    7. M Mitchell Waldrop has written a history of the idea of personal computing from the ideas developed by Vannevar Bush Norbert Wiener, Claude Shannon, and Alan Turing in the 1930s and 1940s through to Jobs, Gates, and Berners Lee in the 1990s He uses the career of J.C.R Licklider remarkable in his own right to hold the story together.It is a remarkable tale, and those of us who think seriously about computers would do well to learn it many of the concepts and approaches that have made computing wh [...]

    8. This is the most comprehensive account of computer history I ve read so far It begins in the 1930 40s, winding through the seminal ideas of Vannevar Bush, von Neumann, Shannon, and Turing I was happily surprised that it touched on the development of cognitive science and emphasized how interdisciplinary computer science really is It then extends to the 1960 70s when personal computing began to be realized by Engelbart and Xerox PARC, and also ties in the development of networking with ARPANET an [...]

    9. Really good, absorbing, history of the early days of computing 50s to 80s Really ties together and digs into all the different pieces that brought us from ENIAC to the internet and the PC, in a very absorbing way.

    10. Not so much a biography of Licklider as an accessible history of computing especially the one off ENIAC, EDVAC, Illiac, ad nauseam era tied together by Licklider s story Waldrop leaves him for dozens of pages at a time, especially to cover the von Neumann Eckley Mauch early days, and later again regarding Xerox PARC Less dense than From Whirlwind to MITRE and less slapdash than Where Wizards Stay Up Late, it s probably the best single pop history of computing I ve come across With that said, whi [...]

    11. Lent to me by chance by a coworker, I am having a hard time putting this down I ve made it through the first quarter of this fairly dense book and already we ve covered the contributions of N Weiner, C Shannon, J von Neumann, A Turning and at least a hundred others.Waldrop clearly has a very broad understanding of this early history of computers, and brings to life the range of characters, personalities and driving circumstances of how it all happened It s just about 1960 now, the Cold War is on [...]

    12. It describes the history of computers from the people s minds You can touch the great people who made the new industry to revolve A lot of people assume technology just evolves itself That s how it s portrayed in popular movies But that s not true There s no magic There are always people working day and night to make that happen, and we just take it for granted That s the primary message I got from this book We need of this type of books.

    13. As a professional computer scientist, I have to say this is the single best book on the history of information processing I ve ever read Highly, highly recommended If you like this one, you d probably also like Tracy Kidder s The Soul of a New Machine a Pulitzer winner in the general non fiction category.

    14. An incredible history of the modern, interactive, personal computer Unlike many books which seem to be to long, this book was too short I had trouble getting through this book because of how densely packed it is with carefully researched history.

    15. This book is an utterly massive tome on the development of the computer, the internet, and personal computing It is barely about J.C.R Licklider at all, so it s a little confusing as to why they even bothered with the conceit of it being a biography.

    16. Read this quite a few years ago pre , saving now so I don t keep forgetting the title What I remember is that it was a really good book.

    17. The role J.C.R Licklider played in creating the Internet and the entire personal computer revolution Very well researched and written.

    18. Interesting read, about the history of how computers turned from obscure calculating machines to everyday tools A bit long, and maybe not very organised

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