Inside Toyland: Working, Shopping, and Social Inequality #2020

Inside Toyland: Working, Shopping, and Social Inequality Christine L. Williams Inside Toyland Working Shopping and Social Inequality I got my first job working in a toy store when I was years old So begins sociologist Christine Williams s description of her stint as a low wage worker at two national toy store chains one upscale

  • Title: Inside Toyland: Working, Shopping, and Social Inequality
  • Author: Christine L. Williams
  • ISBN: 9780520247178
  • Page: 135
  • Format: Paperback
  • Inside Toyland: Working, Shopping, and Social Inequality Christine L. Williams I got my first job working in a toy store when I was 41 years old So begins sociologist Christine Williams s description of her stint as a low wage worker at two national toy store chains one upscale shop and one big box outlet In this provocative, perceptive, and lively book, studded with rich observations from the shop floor, Williams chronicles her experiences as a I got my first job working in a toy store when I was 41 years old So begins sociologist Christine Williams s description of her stint as a low wage worker at two national toy store chains one upscale shop and one big box outlet In this provocative, perceptive, and lively book, studded with rich observations from the shop floor, Williams chronicles her experiences as a cashier, salesperson, and stocker and provides broad ranging, often startling, insights into the social impact of shopping for toys Taking a new look at what selling and buying for kids are all about, she illuminates the politics of how we shop, exposes the realities of low wage retail work, and discovers how class, race, and gender manifest and reproduce themselves in our shopping mall culture.Despite their differences, Williams finds that both toy stores perpetuate social inequality in a variety of ways She observes that workers are often assigned to different tasks and functions on the basis of gender and race that racial dynamics between black staff and white customers can play out in complex and intense ways that unions can t protect workers from harassment from supervisors or demeaning customers even in the upscale toy store And she discovers how lessons that adults teach to children about shopping can legitimize economic and social hierarchies In the end, however, Inside Toyland is not an anticonsumer diatribe Williams discusses specific changes in labor law and in the organization of the retail industry that can better promote social justice.
    Inside Toyland: Working, Shopping, and Social Inequality Christine L. Williams

    • [MOBI] ✓ Inside Toyland: Working, Shopping, and Social Inequality | By Û Christine L. Williams
      135 Christine L. Williams
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      Posted by:Christine L. Williams
      Published :2020-01-10T09:58:47+00:00

    One thought on “Inside Toyland: Working, Shopping, and Social Inequality”

    1. The author, a sociologist, took two jobs working in toy stores while she was on a sabbatical from her teaching job at the University of Texas The picture that she paints of retail work is a discouraging one One of the toy stores she worked at was a big box store that had a diversified clientele and racially diverse employees The other was upscale appealing to the upper middle class shopper and the sales people were primarily white In both cases the managerial jobs went to the men with the women [...]

    2. This was an incredibly boring book I ve never worked in a toy store but from working in a grocery store, I can tell you that I have experienced all of this first hand and having to read about it was a waste of my time I don t understand why any of this was worth writing down Anyone could tell you these things.

    3. CLW hits it out of the park with this one this book was fantastic I would particularly recommend it instead of the Juliet Schor books I recently reviewed CLW takes a much nuanced approach, looking not at whether consumption is good or evil, but instead examining how relationships of race, class, and gender are played out in the employment practices, store policies, and customer interactions via ethnographic work in two different toy store chains Her detailed observation as well as her even hand [...]

    4. Interesting, but kind of depressing It s tough to aviod shopping in these big box stores where employees are miserably treated, low paid and tracked by gender and race into separate streams of work I was disappointed that the unionized store the author described had many of the same problems and closed due to bankruptcy anyway Maybe online shopping is the answer Wonder how employees at are faring

    5. The section on teaching kids how to shop was especially interesting There are a lot of ideas brought up here In spite of its academic style, it sustains interest.

    6. It was an interesting read, although I d hoped for horror stories about working at toy stores Definitely a lot of social context and studies research cited.

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